For the last five years McCahon House Trust and the Fukutake family have been exploring the possibility of a New Zealand artist residency and participation in the prestigious Setouchi Triennale. Together with founding partner Asia New Zealand Foundation, and with funds raised by McCahon House Tommorow patrons and Creative New Zealand Toi Aotearoa, we are thrilled to announce a new month-long residency opportunity for a New Zealand artist in Benesse Art Site Naoshima, Japan to coincide with the Setouchi Triennale 2025.

As the project develops, we will continue to update this page. 

McCahon House Trust and Bundanon have formed a new partnership to offer an international residency exchange. Bundanon is an art museum and residency embedded in the landscape, situated near Shoalhaven, New South Wales, Australia. A wildlife sanctuary set on 1000 hectares, it was the home of painter Arthur Boyd. The organisation creates learning programs for students of all ages and operates Australia's largest artist in residence programme across disciplines.  
We are delighted to announce that Aotearoa New Zealand artist Madison Kelly will undertake the inaugural month-long residency at Bundanon in  August 2024.  We will host the reciprocal residency at Parehuia in 2025.

McCahon House, in partnership with Auckland Writers Festival, was pleased to present the launch of Benesse Art Site Naoshima’s founder, Mr. Soichiro Fukutake’s book, With Art As My Weapon, on Saturday 13th May 2023 In his book, Mr. Fukutake discusses art, architecture, and nature as tools for social and economic revitalisation and regeneration as evidenced by the Benesse Art Site Naoshima in the Setouchi Inland Sea, Japan.

Please scroll down to view Mr Fukutake's presentation on his book With Art As My Weapon, at the 2023 Auckland Writer's Festival. 

The McCahon House Trust warmly invites you to spend a memorable day at the Gibbs Farm Sculpture Park. Your visit will help us to raise funds for our education and public programmes, in addition to the operational costs of running the McCahon House Artists’ Residency.

Spread over almost 400 hectares of rolling hills overlooking the Kaipara Harbour, the privately-owned sculpture park houses the largest collection of monumental sculptures in Aotearoa by internationally recognised artists from New Zealand and abroad. The park also includes several exotic animals such as emus and giraffes. 
$100 Adult
$70 Student (ID required at Gate)
$40 Child (12 years and under)
$250 Family (2 adults and 2 children)
Free (5 and under)
Book tickets here

Log cabin patchwork with Bronwyn Lloyd

9 am - 12 pm

Cost: $40
Suitable for all skill levels.
Materials provided. Bring a pair of scissors suitable for cutting fabric.

Jogakbo with Steven Junil Park

1 pm - 4 pm

Cost: $40
Suitable for all skill levels.
Materials provided.

 

For this dinner, Chef Jack Crosti responded to Zac's practice of bringing together unexpected materials from different time periods, civilizations, and environments, while employing his organic approach to food and cooking which emphasises the gifts of nature and celebrates the hard work of farmers and producers.

Featuring an exhibition of kauri works by Colin McCahon, Emily Karaka, Shane Cotton, Imogen Taylor, and Cora-Allan Wickliffe, natural pigment-making activity for tamariki and whānau, and an artist talk with Emily Karaka, Cora-Allan Lafaiki Twiss, and Nigel Borell on Thursday, 5 May at 6 pm.

Throughout the week, Kauri Ora open editions by Emily Karaka are available to purchase, as well as limited editions of McCahon House Kauri Project saplings. Grown from the very trees that were loved and painted by Colin McCahon from his Titirangi home of the 1950s, this new generation of kauri are confirmed to be free of kauri dieback disease.

To purchase the Kauri Ora editions by Emily Karaka, and McCahon House Kauri Project saplings, visit our online store.

Needlepoint Charm with Bronwyn Lloyd
(Fully booked)

9 am - 12 pm

Cost: $65
Suitable for all skill levels.
Materials provided. Bring a pair of scissors

Weaving with Kathryn Tsui
(2x spaces left)

1 pm - 4 pm

Cost: $40
Suitable for all skill levels.
Materials provided. Bring a pair of scissors and a fork.
Feel free to bring your favourite 8ply wool.

 

An exhibition of needlepoint works by Bronwyn Lloyd and weaving work by Kathryn Tsui at McCahon House Museum.

The exhibition is complemented by a series of weekend workshops, and an artist talk with Bronwyn Lloyd, Kathryn Tsui, Sebastian Clarke, and Julia Waite.

The McCahon House Gate programme helps build the careers of New Zealand artists. Our premium programme provides supporters with unique insights and experiences into the creative development process of artists and art making.

For this dinner, resident artist Emily Karaka collaborated with her whanaunga, hāngi master Rewi Spraggon. In 2009, the McCahon House artist’s residence was gifted the name Parehuia by Te Kawerau ā Maki elder, Eru Thompson. Throughout the evening, Emily, Rewi and Pita Turei shared Te Kawerau ā Maki stories of Parehuia and Titirangi. We were thrilled to offer hāngi kai to guests.

Rewi Spraggon’s Hāngi Master food truck is a well-known fixture both at Otara Markets and outside Auckland Ferry Terminal. For more information visit www.hangimaster.co.nz

Spend a Sunday on the shores of the Kaipara Harbour. Stroll amongst an awe-inspiring collection of sculpture by world renowned artists, set in the beautiful rolling hills of the Gibbs Farm Sculpture Park, all in support of the McCahon House Trust. 

 

Tickets and Gourmet Lunch pre-orders are available at the link below.

 

This dinner was a collaboration between resident artist Richard Frater, K Road based OPEN coffee and social enterprise Whakamanatia. The result was a generous evening sharing stories of displacement, land loss and environmental issues; alongside the sharing and celebrating of kai and rituals towards healing and connection through stories of Te Ao Māori and connection to taiao our natural environment.

McCahon House hosted two live stream launches to celebrate the publication of ‘Endless Yet Never’ by Martin Edmond. 

On Tuesday 3rd November, Martin Edmond in conversation with Courtney Johnston (Tumu Whakarae/Chief Executive of Te Papa Tongarewa Museum of New Zealand).

On Sunday 8th November, Martin Edmond in conversation with Rex Butler (Art historian, writer and Professor of Art History & Theory at Monash University).

Watch recordings of these conversations below.

Endless Yet Never can be purchased via our webstore here.


_____________________


Martin Edmond was born in Ohakune, New Zealand and lives in Sydney, Australia. He has a BA in English and Anthropology from Auckland University (1975), an MA (Hons) in English Literature and Language from Victoria University of Wellington (1977) and a Doctorate of Creative Arts from Western Sydney University (2013). He has written a number of books on art and artists, including The Resurrection of Philip Clairmont (1999), The Supply Party - Ludwig Becker on the Burke and Wills Expedition (2009), Dark Night: walking with McCahon (2011) and Battarbee and Namatjira (2014). A biography of convict artist Joseph Lycett remains unpublished. He was given the Prime Minister’s Award for achievement in non-fiction in 2013.

_____________________


Courtney Johnston took up the role of Tumu Whakarae | Chief Executive at Te Papa in December 2019, after join the museum in September 2018 as Director Audience & Insight. Courtney has lived and worked in Wellington since 2000. She holds a Masters in Art History from Victoria University of Wellington, and was the 2015 recipient of a Winston Churchill Memorial Trust Scholarship to research contemporary museum practice in the United States. From 2012 to 2018, Courtney was Director of The Dowse Art Museum, a highlight from this role was curating Gavin Hipkins: The Domain, an expansive survey of this New Zealand photographer's work, and editing the accompanying publication. She was also the visual arts correspondent for RNZ’s ‘Nine to Noon with Kathryn Ryan’ from 2010 to 2019.

_____________________


Rex Butler is Professor of Art History at Monash University, Melbourne. He is a great fan of Colin McCahon ever since seeing his 1984 exhibition at the Biennale of Sydney as a university student. He has written on McCahon’s work several times, both by himself and with Laurence Simmons.